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for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote
mandela died at the age of 95. mandela, a remarkable life dedicated his to fighting for civil rights in south africa. mandela lived long enough to see a multiracial democratic south africa. he called it the rainbow nation. the grief over his death crossed racial lines ha he devoted his to erasing. a young man at the age of 25, he joined the african national congress in 1956. mandela was arrested with 155 other political activists and was changed with high treason. the treason trial lasted 4 1/2 years. the charges against him were ultimately dropped. mandela used a false identity to evade the government and traveled to europe and other countries in africa to built support for the anc and study guerilla warfare. when he returned to south africa in 1962, mandela was arrested and sentenced to years in prison. during his sentence, the government charmed mandela and other anc leaders with sabotage and attempting to violently overthrow the government. the winner of 1964, mandela and his colleagues were sentenced to in prison. mandela's brutal imprisonment helped win freedom for his nation.
in the ranks of leadership of a civil rights group called the african national congress, the a.n.c. >> they were the revolutionaries of their day. they were the wild young men. >> teichner: former "time" magazine editor rick stengel spent countless hours in private conversation with mandela while collaborating on mandela's autobiography. >> mandela went to johannesburg as a young man and was treated in the terrible way that young black men were treated in the 1950s. i think this had a huge effect on him. >> teichner: mandela was in the forefront of growing resistance by the a.n.c., which began to protest the hated laws requiring blacks to carry passes, restricting where they could go. then, a galvanizing moment caught the world's attention. on march 21, 1960, in sharpeville, the peaceful civil rights movement was pierced with bullets. ( gunfire ) walter cronkite reported. >> police mounted on tanks opened fire. 69 natives were killed, 176 wounded. most of the victims were shot in the back. >> teichner: it was against this blood-red backdrop that nelson mandela took up arms. >>
of south africa. many of us here in the civil rights movement this this country were involved in anti-apartheid movement and were involved in the free mandela movement. went to jail saying that south africa should be demock raitized. mandela should be free. they led those rallies and marches. i remember in 1994, i was part of the election that went over with other civil rights activists and we would actually be observers when the first election happened in south africa that election day and see an elected nelson mandela president. just being around him when he first came to this country and how he was before being president. any time you were around him, you had a sense you were in the presence of greatness. in the sense of searching around anybody else. nelson mandela had a gravity yet humility that was unmatched. the world has lot of someone who has literally changed world history. this is not just the first president or a first black president. this is one who led the evolution and revolution of a nation and became the first president and became a universal symbol of tolerance, of
of the years he now was experiencing. >> i was so struck by john lewis saying that as a young civil rights leader and activist, he was so influenced -- he and his fellow college students saying they were so influenced by mandela and mandela saying when they met that he had been following the civil rights movement in the united states. you were front and center as part of that movement, the civil rights movement here. you had that experience also in talking to him, the cross-fertilization of these freedom movements. >> yes, i think they fed off of each other. i think while the united states civil rights movement came of age and its victory much earlier than the apartheid struggle, they were very much alike. i think that's what enabled me, i think, to have the success to the extent i did to have it. i didn't go as a journalist going in an objective way, i was informed by the experiences we had in the south and in the united states. so when i got there, i understand. there were significant differences. in south africa the majority were the black people and they had been suppressed by a minori
. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the
, almost like he was interviewing me about american politics and the civil rights movement. because in south africa, the majority of the population is black. he wanted to know, wait, how did a minority in the united states achieve civil rights? we ended up talking about, and he's fascinating with the founding fathers. the idea that george washington gives up power one term. something mandela later does. but also citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states. remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. in a sense, we were inspiring too nelson mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything when you sat down with him that really surpriseded you? i'm sure you prepared ahead of time and researched them and got to know the man through what you were able to read and hear from other personal anecdotes. what did you take away from it? >> i think the thing that surprised me the most is i was saying, you know, mr. mandela, you are a beacon to the world in terms of freedom, struggle, the sacrifice, the 27 years in jail, standing up for principle. he started l
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. joining me charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
politics and the american civil rights movement. in south africisa the majority the population is black and hert white. he wanted to know how did a minority end up achieving civilh rights. he's fasecinated with the founding fathers. it's something mandela also does. but also, citizenship. the whole idea that you have rights in the united states.uth remember, blacks in south africa had none of that. so we were inspiring to nelson t mandela. >> i'm certain of that. was there anything that really surprised you? i'm sure you prepare add head of time and researched him and gota to know the man through what you were able to read and hear through other personal ane anecdotes. >> i said you are a beacon to the world in terms of the sacrifice and 27 years in jail. standing up for principal: he started laughing. i was taken aback. i thought he's not understanding this american guy, you know? but he said no.wa it's when he was growing up all he wanted to do was rebel against his parents. hewa wanted to get out of the b tribal situation. he was like a prince and go to the big city of johannesburg.
-racist, non-sexist country which certainly has a compatible legacy in our country's dr. king and civil rights movement here, which it's interesting there was a symbiosis between the civil rights movement and south african movement, they took a tremendous amount of inspiration from dr. king in the civil rights movement in the united states, if you think about 196 3, he went to prison in 1964. >> there is no doubt which gets me to the next question from professor ogletree, in terms of the impact that the anti parti movement around the world had and here in the united states had on the end of a paratide, how significant was it? >> it was very significant. remember, anderson, this was during the regan administration and ronald reagan opposed what we were doing and have towed issues to talk about opening up the system in south africa to end the partide. thousands of people got arrested in washington d.c. and i got a group of lawyers together to represent them for nothing. they were released and not charged with an offense. it was a national issue, black, white, male, female, people on the left, ri
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
that will nelson mandela set. >> want to bring in andrew young, civil rights leader and former ambassador to the united nations. welcome, as well as james joseph, former u.s. ambassador to south africa and duke university professor, both of who new mandela very well on a personal level. ambassador, i'd like to start with you. you draw parallels. you talk about how this was so important, so significant in some ways to the civil rights movement and the struggle at the time. for us, i was a college student when we had a lot of those divest from the from the south africa shantytowns in the yards of the campuses. tell us the connected you had with the civil rights movement. >> understood that as dr. king said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. and so we knew of chief albert la tooley and the african national crisis. we entertained oliver tambo and mbeki when they were in exile. but my first real conflict, i went to south africa with arthur ashe in 1974 to play tennis. we tried to seaman della and didn't but we saw robert subuqwai who had just gotten out of jail and we start
was a protest against apartheid. >> and it's interesting, he being too young for the civil rights era, reverend jackson, but first to charles ogletree, this was the connection point was apartheid. this was the inspiration nelson mandela, who he could experience realtime, the joy of that deliverance realtime. >> that's exactly right. i was a student at stanford when i heard the movement about divestment from south africa in 1972. in 1971, barack obama was only ten years old so he was very young and never able to appreciate that. what i want to make clear, though, we shouldn't call him militant, we shouldn't call him a terrorist, he's a patriot. he's just like the patriots fighting here many, many centuries ago for equality. and that's what he was. he was a patriot who tried to make sure that his country where he was born, where he controlled would recognize the fact that the majority of people who were african were suppressed by the minority of people who were white, and that has to be changed. he is a patriot who did a great deal in his 27 years in prison and did a great deal as president and c
, but those that work for freedom and civil rights across the world. we begin with the great man's own words. the ones we will all remember of him. >> difficulties he once wrote to his wife, wreak some men. but make others. real leaders, he said, must be ready to sacrifice all, for the freedom of their people. i can rest only for a moment before with freedom, come responsibility and i dare not linger for my long walk is not yet ended. his long walk ended today, as he died at the age of 95. this is the moment of deeper sorrow. yet what made him great is what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. >> looking back now to the headdy days in 1990, and the days after that, the excitement throughout the world even the months after that, leaf him here in the wrights. joining us here in the studio, she helped to organize nelson mandela's first tour after he was released from prison, and it was really quite soon after his release, can you take us back to that moment? it is june of 1990, and america is seeing nelson mandela, how emotional was it here? >> it was really pan polonium. it
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
as director of the southern africa project of the lawyers committee for civil rights under law. douglas foster is the author of "after mandela: the struggle for freedom in post-apartheid south africa." he's an associate professor at northwestern university's medill school of journalism. donald gibb and john stremlau is vice president for peace programs at the carter center. he taught at the university of the witwatersrand in johannesburg. >> welcome to you all.gay mcdour first reaction tonight on hearing of the loss of nelson mandela? >> well, i'm terribly sad.of co. we knew it was coming. but nevertheless, it is a shock. and it's quite sad thing. i think first of all, the people of south africa who would be mourning in a very special way, but i think all around the world has lost a hero, a hero that we desperately needed, when he came forward and faif us hope. >> -- gave us hope. >> as we continue thisconversat. we do want to say to local stations that we are not going to be taking a break tonight so we can continue to discuss nelson mandela's life and legacy. and i want to pick up with you p
president. you looking at the scene. a man who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity. >> days to come, we will bring you extensive coverage, detailed coverage of his life, president obama spoke about mandela minutes after his death was announced, here is what he said. >> we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us to be the example he set, to make decisions guarded not by haste, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make. strive for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. >> . >> right now let's pause and give thanks the r the fact that nelson mandela lived, a pan who took history, in his hands. bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice, may god bless his memory, and keep him at peace. >> the president of the united states, again, live pictures in outside nelson mandela's home tonight, and here in new york, a live picture of the apollo theater, the same the venue in harlem, tonight the marque honors nelson mandela. here is a picture of the marque, we are getting ready for a live shot. we h
of gandhi. martin luther king, america's civil rights movement. i think it's fair to say that history will show the student became the teacher. america the world, his classroom. >> every individual life has a lesson. >> yes. >> thank you so much, byron. >>> still ahead on this special edition of "world news," you're going to meet mandela's jailer, a country boy who became a lifelong friend. that's ahead. ♪ [ male announcer ] your eyes. even at a distance of 10 miles... the length of 146 football fields... they can see the light of a single candle. your eyes are amazing. look after them with centrum silver. multivitamins with lutein and vitamins a, c, and e to support healthy eyes and packed with key nutrients to support your heart and brain, too. centrum silver. for the most amazing parts of you. ♪ >>> nelson mandela standing inside the cell that once held him prisoner and mandela walked out of prison with a lesson for living, saying to walk free is not merely to cast off change but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. he did something behind those pr
the civil rights icon. >> they think about the usedings of gandhi, and he them to free the south african people. -- and he was here was freed from the south african prison. >> he represented so much to the world. >> tomorrow morning, the deputy ambassador will open up the fence so they can get closer to the statue, with the condolence book for everyone to sign. >> thank you very much. howard university has a vigil in his honor tonight, to give the community a place to gather. stay with abc seven and lbj l.a..com, -- wjla.com, for "good morning washington" tomorrow morning. we turn to breaking news out of prince george county. we have live pictures from news chap -- news chopper seven. asphalt,t laurel authorities tell us, two hazmat containers are on fire there. and to the other story we are watching tonight, the weather. there are big changes coming our way. we have more on what we can expect. >> it is still 63 degrees, late at night here, outside of the weather center, let's check out the doppler radar. showers, few more especially to the midday afternoon evening. ahead of a very stron
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
is a key player in the civil rights movement. jenna was an inspiration to end users importantly this morning to get a tree. as for the basic colors. nichole. which even the least arguable that you can overcome any obstacles that anyone rushing off to bible cause of the checks dentist told us all montana's is it. and the cement that was coming he really. he was lying. i just felt really very proud to be havin guy to be an african american to be decades before the anti apartheid. i checked his pulse to toe with steve johnson says he will continue to preach about this is done for monday. these rates move continued to my earn more and more and more about twelve we used to symbolize to try it on monday as nineteen ninety four visits. he came back to holland began to show solidarity. can americans once again produced. i would stick to it now and how people are reacting on the internet to mandela isn't that an event run by shannon bennett ran on china but every scene. well i feel are taking to twitter especially this painting daily list of reactions than on basically every minute burie
for freedom. the music moved and motivated an embattled people. our civil rights movement had its music, but, in south africa, hundreds of songs rang out. >> ( singing "nanku" ) >> marsalis: "nanku," recorded by mariam makeba, kept alive the spirit of mandela and others locked up on robben island. >> the nation's feelings when those guys were all in jail was how much they missed them. ( sings "nangue" ) and it says they are all rotting in jail. while we need them here, they are all rotting in jail. >> ♪ nan gue nanque nangue, mandela oh, my africa. ♪ >> you know, nobody had seen him since the 1960s. by the '80s, you were not allowed to say his name in south africa. ♪ >> marsalis: in the mid 1980s, hugh was far from home, making music in botswana when nelson mandela reached out to him. in 1985, he was still incarcerated. he took the time to write you a letter on your birthday. >> he just had this letter smuggled out of prison. here's a guy who's been in jail for 20 years, but he's writing to me, giving me encouragement. i just stood there and said, "wow," and i then went to the piano an
the context in which he lived. you had the inverse in the civil rights movement. you had a native african population that was seven times larger than the ruling class that essentially turned them and enslaved them in their own country. they were made a third-class citizen, a noncitizen, a nonperson within a land that they called their ancestoral home and they tried to fight apartheid and oppression in certain ways, sometimes through revolutionary struggle, violent struggle. they would try nonviolence and they would be met with incredible, intense violence. the amount of violence that it took to suppress this large african population was incredible. so what mandela for gave is something that is almost indescribable for most people and i think for a lot of african-americans, this was the struggle for a lot of campuses that came after the generation of vietnam. so you have the civil rights struggle, which was the 1960s, the big young people's revolution. then you had the fight against vietnam. but for a lot of people, particularly in the 1980s, it was this. it was the fight against apartheid
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
brazile is here, nelson mandela, the civil rights movement in the united states, what was going on in south africa, you and i are old enough to remember those days, the role and as christiane accurately points out, that all of us played in trying to move south africa in a better direction. you remember those days very vividly. >> well, the apartheid regime was a brutal regime. it was a violent regime. and the goal of folks in america, especially young people, was to educate, was to mobilize and to get more sanctions, to get corporations doing business in south africa to put pressure on the south african government. clearly it worked, because after years and years of struggle, finally in 1990, we broke the apartheid regime but it was a long and brutal struggle. >> here's a picture, take a look at this. >>> give us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south afri
his long struggle in the hospital since june and before has come to an end. the iconic civil rights leader and former president of south africa, nelson mandela, is dead today at 95. fox news new york continuing coverage on fox news channel, satellite and cable, more coverage later on your late local news. we continue our coverage on fox news channel across the country and around the world. the death of nelson mandela is not unexpected. we are looking at live pick ktu outside the hospital and near his home. south africa has a week long remembrance planned for him planned well in advance and will be announced by the government shortly is my understanding. we're anticipating we'll hear further from the president at some point. chris matthews is scheduled to interview him today. i believe that was scheduled to be live as part of a college tour. we'll have access to that. we're waiting for word from the white house. nelson mandela a friend to folks around the world. as we wait for further news, i can tell you the associate press puts it, he became one of the world's most beloved statesm
-in with congressman walter fauntroy and civil rights leader mary frances berry at the south african embassy in washington, d.c they told the ambassador that they would not leave until their demands were met. >> first was the immediate release of nelson mandela from prison. the second demand was that all of the black political prisoners be released. and thirdly that they begin immediately the dismantlement of the apartheid system. >> reporter: all three were jailed. that one act of civil disobedience led to a year of daily protests at the embassy where celebrities, members of congress, and citizens were also arrested. >> we put 5,000 people in jail at the embassy and that drove the headlines. >> free south africa! >> reporter: the movement pressured politicians to act. >> on this vote -- >> reporter: and in 1986 congress overroad president reagan's veto and imposed trade sanctions against south africa. u.s. businesses were forced to divest, costing the regime over $350 million that year alone. four years later, mandela was free. >> nelson mandela taking his first steps into a new south afric
and the civil rights movement in the united states had many things in common. they did they actually today it's just a day of different sets of circumstances in the united states african americans why in the monarchy. anso it was a fraction of the population up saying that we wanted to acquire rights just as everyone else was in south africa eu yet the majority of black south africans who were old friends i mean argue whites so they aware there were some differences but there were some similarities in terms of segregation are and and and so all of those of the areas that had to be broken now. so while they are some similarities. the b two different types of movements ultimately getting rid of apartheid. in in a sense certainly is this the same is getting or use some left their similarities to getting rid of racism up the room throughout our world. o'neill is the fact that both him and ella had so much empathy mimi was ready to understand and appreciate the fifth of what some africans had evened out a piece way when we look at what he did in the sport's the renamed he rants and champion the ga
rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back. we must address the federal mindset that values arrest rates. >> if it were your could, would there be a chance to be rehabilitating them. it is a health problem and will not get better in prison. would you want to know that there might be other solutions? they should get back into society. they should be able to get a job. they shou
by hard it's been because stuff that's worth it is always hard. the civil rights movement was hard. get women the right to vote, that was hard. making sure that workers have the right to organize, that was hard. you know, it's never been easy for us to change how we do business in this country. this has been the case for social security, for medicare, for all of the great social progress that we've made in this country. >> krystal, it sounds like he's trying to get them to remember the reason they got involved in his presidential campaign. >> yeah, i think so. and i think it's important that we keep the perspective on why it's taken so long to reform our health insurance. it is because it's hard and there are parts that are disruptive and it makes people uncomfortable but ultimately we have put our faith and trust in this law and in this president and i think we're going to be better off for it. >> zeke emanuel and krystal ball, thank you. >>> coming up, a last word exclusive, those three high school athletes who were arrested in rochester, new york, this week while they were waiting fo
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity.
because of one man. same way in the united states. it was martin luther king who set the premise of civil rights and made the non violence the essential element, almost a religion. because of him we ended up in the happy place we are now with a peaceful transition and ultimately a black president. >> as you were speaking, f.w. clerk almost on queue put out a statement saying mandela's courage, charm, were an inspiration not only for south africans but the whole world. i believe his example will live on and we'll continue to inspire all to achieve his vision of non racialism, justice, human dignity and equality for all. we shall miss you. we know your spirit and example will be there to guide us to a better south africa. coming up, the obama care story isn't going anywhere. there's other news today. stay with us. farmer: hello, i'm an idaho potato farmer. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back
in the american civil rights movement. you had a native african population that was seven times larger than the ruling class that essentially turned them and enslaved them in their own country. they were need not even a second, a third class citizen, a non-person within a land that they called their anses tral home. and the national african congress and nelson mandela tried to fight this oppression in various ways. sometimes through violent struggle. they would try non-violence. they were met with incredible violence. it was intense and incredible. so what mandela forgave is something that is almost indescribable for many. this is what came after the generation of vietnam. then you had the fight against vietnam. but for a lot of people, particularly in the 1980s, it was this. it was the fight against apartheid in south africa that galvanized a lot of african-americans. >> i asked the last word staff today for a show of hands of how many personally remember apartheid and very few hands went up. i was at your class at columbia, and i can tell with your students, they don't remember apartheid.
. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nation
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
. >> the civil rights movement, where people's rights were being violated. in south africa, there was no constitution and there were no rights. so apartheid was really a labor system, a way of controlling black workers to the benefit of the people who owned the mine and the resources of that country. and so the whole system regulated people's lives, almost in every dimension, where they could live, where they could work, and they couldn't violate those rules. they couldn't be in the city after dark. they couldn't, you know, work in certain areas. it was a tightly regulated, really a fascist, to use a word that we don't use much anymore. it's that kind of a white nationalist regime. >> i mean, there were -- and we should just say, there were secret police. during nelson mandela's imprisonment, it was illegal to have a picture of him, right? these are -- >> it's all true, chris. >> it couldn't put it in a newspaper. they couldn't put his face or name in a newspaper. >> a lot of us forget that the united states government and many western governments supported white south afri
person. the disabled people of america are fighting hard for our civil rights. nelson mandela has done a lot of work things considered for things like slavery. we have a topic similar. you are not entitled to the minimum wage here in america. we are specifically exempt. we are so inspired by the work of nelson mandela, we try to continue in that legacy. we want to make it so that our people, our disabled people, are no longer trapped in these workshops. host: why the blind exempt from the minimum wage? caller: the fair labor standards act of 1938 specifically exempts us. the idea is that disabled people are supposed to be inherently less productive. we are less than people. there are a lot of explanations. some people think they are doing by employing disabled people at a penny an our. it is exploiting us. whenever go on to real productive life. we are pushing hard to try to get that change. we want to be able to earn minimum wage for our work, or not work at all. disabled people have the the cassidy to be -- have the thatity to make the change nelson mandela made. host: thank you for
to compound. so the two things i end up by saying, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. hat's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have the sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common heritage and for sure a common destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of you have to do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was an act of statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. if you don't work with your party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll
know, i was part of the civil rights movement in the south. he said oh, do you know maya angelou? she meant so much to me, reading her in prison. you were in his heart and mind all those years. >> he told charlene gault that people had been slipping my books into him all the years. i spoke with one journalist who said, can you imagine being in the hell hole of a south african prison reading the caged bird. >> this means so much to us. i know you've been through a lot in the last days. we just want to say thank you for recollections, thank you for your poetry, and thank you for being with us today. >> thank you miss mitchell. i admire. i watch you with great gratitude and appreciation. >> that is an enormous honor. >> that you very much for your own gentleness. you report on some hellish situations around the world but i never hear the hell in your voice. thank you. >> thank you for that. very much so. >> thank you. >> good-bye to you. coming up next, nelson mandela's leadership, his legacy. but first "nbc nightly news" anchor brian williams sat down in south africa with former preside
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
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